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The Icon Bar: News and features: RISC OS on GitHub
 

RISC OS on GitHub

Posted by Mark Stephens on 07:49, 15/9/2017 | , ,
 
In a previous article, we mentioned Git and GitHub.
 
Git is a version control system which software developers use. Once you have used version control is is very hard to go back. In particular it:-
1. Allows you to have a full, documented history of all changes you have made and roll back to any point.
2. Label your official release versions.
3. See what you have changed easily.
4. Work with other developers (even large groups) in an orderly manner, see who has edited which bit of code, merge code changes together and handle conflicts where several people are editing the same code.
5. Have the security of lots of backups.
6. Never lose anything! (if you use it properly)
 
Version control solves a lot of complex problems. When I hire new developers, I always ask them about their experiences with Version control systems....
 
RISC OS itself is available on version control (it uses CVS) and you can explore it online at the ROOL website.
 
Part of the attraction of Git is that it also gives easy access to GitHub (a huge online repository of software source code). And (in theory) it means the source code will never be lost. There are some interesting RISC OS related projects hosted on there. Here is a sample to start your exploration...
 
https://github.com/risc-os-open contains some Ruby and JavaScript projects written by ROOL for their website.
 
https://github.com/TimothyEBaldwin/RO_cvs2git converts RISC OS CVS to git.
 
https://github.com/elesar-uk/titanium-build is the source code for Elesar's Debian Linux build.
 
https://github.com/TimothyEBaldwin/RISC_OS_DevTimothy Baldwin's port of RISC OS to run on Linux.
 
https://github.com/dpt/PrivateEye The source code for Private Eye
 
https://github.com/alanbu/packman Source code for Package manager
 
https://github.com/martenjj/drawview A draw file viewer for Linux.
 
https://github.com/jaylett/zap Source code for !Zap
 
  RISC OS on GitHub
  nunfetishist (09:56 15/9/2017)
 
Rob Kendrick Message #124156, posted by nunfetishist at 09:56, 15/9/2017
nunfetishist
Exposing morons since 1981

Posts: 484
NetSurf is not on GitHub, but it is stored in git:
http://git.netsurf-browser.org/

We don't put it in GitHub because git is a distributed version control system; depending on a centralised commercial resource seems silly.
  ^[ Log in to reply ]
 
David Boddie Message #124163, posted by davidb at 11:09, 20/9/2017
Member
Posts: 116
I have a Mercurial clone of the RISC OS Open sources, not for any particular purpose but more as a safety net in case the CVS server became unavailable.
  ^[ Log in to reply ]
 

The Icon Bar: News and features: RISC OS on GitHub